Stanford's Multi-Faith Forum

From left to right these are: Imam Jihad Turk, John Stackhouse, and Swami Vendenanda. Three speakers representing Islam, Christianity, and Hinduism at Stanford University’s Multi-Faith Forum.

I convinced my friend Tess that it’d be a good idea to visit our Stanford friends (that we met at the grad student retreat) for this event. A friend I made, Ethan Kung, PhD in Bio-Engineering, told me he was organizing this event when we met over winter (and then we had a jam session). I managed to snag Ethan’s opening speech:

So what did I learn? I learned to really appreciate a lot of what Islam is about, I learned very little about Hinduism, and I learned to appreciate the complexity in Christianity. If there is anything to take away from the forum, I’d say that Christianity is appropriately complex, and it needs not my zeal to validate it.

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Strident Atheist and Professor at Stanford Talks about Human Uniqueness and Gives Kudos to Christians

Originally Posted: November 11, 2009 at 1:00pm Primatologist talks about what makes humans different from other species by talking about what makes us all the same. Although many traditional divisions between human cognition and non-human, animal cognition have been observably false, we are still undeniably degrees of complexity from the rest of the world. Six points of interest to me: pro chess players burn between 6000 to 7000 calories in one tournament from thinking in one day. In regards to “theory of mind,” I love studies on cognition. Philosophy of mind is a great interest of mine. He talks about … Continue reading Strident Atheist and Professor at Stanford Talks about Human Uniqueness and Gives Kudos to Christians